Welcome to the blog for Steve Hinch Photography.

On this page you'll find photographic information on the places I've photographed recently as well as some technical information on the photographs themselves. I'll also post updates on what I've seen and experienced in Yellowstone and abroad, current wildlife sightings, and anything else of interest.  Check back often for updates!

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A Few More Birds

April 18, 2018  •  Leave a Comment

Here are a few more birds that call Yellowstone home. I've previously posted photos of these species but wanted to highlight them again.  Above left is the largest of the birds I've posted, the Pine Grosbeak.  Top left is a Pine Siskin while bottom left is the Red Breasted Nuthatch and bottom right is the Mountain Chickadee.  The last two are among the smallest birds in the ecosystem but all rely on seeds as a mainstay for their diet.  Yellowstone, covered largely in pine trees, makes good habitat for seed eating birds.  Yellowstone opens for the summer season on Friday, but I'm currently on the road and will miss the first days in the park.  Stay tuned and I'll will post more next week!


Red Poll

April 17, 2018  •  Leave a Comment

 

Artic VisitorArtic VisitorSubject- Redpoll Image is copyrighted and cannot be used for any reason without expressed written consent by Steve Hinch

Like yesterday's Cassin's Finch, I never knew what a Redpoll was before I saw and then researched one.  This small songbird is a seedeater and is a bird of the far north.  They spend winter in the northern parts of the United States but breed in the northern parts of Alaska and Canada.  Every few years an irruption occurs and they may be found as far south as the central US, depending on availability of seeds.


Cassin's Finch

April 16, 2018  •  Leave a Comment

Cassin'sCassin'sSubject- Cassin's Finch
Image is copyrighted and cannot be used for any reason without expressed written consent by Steve Hinch

Before I saw this bird, I had never heard of a Cassin's Finch.  My first guess was that it was a house finch, which is very similar.  But when I researched it, I found that house finches don't reside in this area.  After looking at the description and some photos, I realized it was a Cassin's.  That was pretty exciting for me since I had never noticed one before, though I may have seen them and not paid any attention.  The bright red crest along with the hint of red in the wing feathers is the give away.


Red Crossbills

April 15, 2018  •  Leave a Comment

Red, Yellow, and GreenRed, Yellow, and GreenSubject- Red Crossbill
Image is copyrighted and cannot be used for any reason without expressed written consent by Steve Hinch

Continuing with bird week as we lead up to the opening day of Yellowstone National Park, this species has become one of my favorites.  I was never much of a bird watcher until I noticed these colorful and charismatic creatures.  While their name, Red Crossbill, would imply they are all red, they actually come in a variety of colors including variations of red, orange, and yellow.

Just Hangin' OutJust Hangin' OutSubject- Red Crossbill
Image is copyrighted and cannot be used for any reason without expressed written consent by Steve Hinch

As with most birds that frequent Yellowstone, crossbills are seed eaters and they use their oddly formed beaks to get to pine seeds.  And sometimes getting to the best pine seeds requires hanging upside down.  As seen below, they get their name from the shape of the bills, which cross over the top and bottom.

Bird with a Crossed BillBird with a Crossed BillSubject- Red Crossbill Image is copyrighted and cannot be used for any reason without expressed written consent by Steve Hinch


Oregon Junco

April 14, 2018  •  Leave a Comment

Oregon JuncoOregon JuncoSubject- Dark Eyed Junco Image is copyrighted and cannot be used for any reason without expressed written consent by Steve Hinch

Over the next couple of weeks, I'm going to share some images of some of Yellowstone's lesser noticed inhabitants.  Yellowstone National Park isn't known as a birder's paradise and usually only the larger species get any attention.  That's certainly understandable as most people who visit want to see bears, bison, wolves, and other large mammals.  But with the park's summer season starting in less than a week, I thought showing some photos of the smaller but certainly equally beautiful creatures would be fun.  This image shows a Dark Eyed Junco perched in an aspen tree.  Juncos come in a wide variety of color patterns but all are considered Dark Eyed Juncos.  Along the Rockies and further west, a color variation called the "Oregon" Junco is common and is seen here.  The dark head and brownish body with white breast make the Oregon Junco stand apart from other color variations.

 


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