Welcome to the blog for Steve Hinch Photography.

On this page you'll find photographic information on the places I've photographed recently as well as some technical information on the photographs themselves. I'll also post updates on what I've seen and experienced in Yellowstone and abroad, current wildlife sightings, and anything else of interest.  Check back often for updates!

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"Tiny"

August 05, 2015  •  Leave a Comment


 

If this isn't reason enough to slow down and keep an eye out when driving through Yellowstone, then perhaps Yellowstone isn't the place for you to visit. This little bear cub approached the road to cross it, following it's mother last month. This bear family spent a lot of time near the road at the end of June but fortunately, so far at least, both cubs and mom are doing well. Yellowstone has many curvy roads and you never know what may be around the corner. That's why it's always a good idea to follow the speed limit and keep an eye on the road.
 


"Baby Marmots"

August 03, 2015  •  Leave a Comment


 

In keeping with the small animal theme set by Sunday's photo of the week, here are a couple of baby marmots interacting. Taken earlier this summer, these were two of several baby marmots that appeared in a marmot colony. They both decided to sun themselves on the same rock, where they briefly interacted. Even for small animals like these, I always use long telephoto lenses to capture the image. This allows the animals to behave naturally and doesn't put stress on them. And it keeps me safe as well.


Photo of the Week- "Little Predator"

August 02, 2015  •  Leave a Comment


 

Most people who visit Yellowstone want to see the big megafauna such as grizzly or black bears, bison, wolves, and elk.  Few people, other than a handful of wildlife photographers hope to see some of the smaller predators, such as this short tailed weasel.  This little guy started to run across the road as I was driving one morning, but it turned back.  I stopped and looked, which I always do when I see a weasel or a marten.  Most of the time, they've vanished from sight, not matter how quickly I manage to stop.  But this time, I saw the little face staring back at me, so I grabbed my camera and hopped out.  Again, I expected the weasel to vanish, but as I watched it, it watched me.  If I moved the slightest, it would vanish into the rocks faster than I could imagine, but within a few seconds, it would pop back out and watch me from a different angle.  Finally, after about 15 minutes of this, it hopped off through the rocks and finally crossed the road safely, vanishing into the long grass on the other side.
 


"Puppy Eyes"

July 27, 2015  •  Leave a Comment


 

I posted a photo of this kit in similar light at the entrance to their den a while back, but am still going through some of those photos and decided I really liked this one and wanted to share it with you. The kit watched as a raven flew overhead. When kits are small enough, ravens pose a serious threat to them and can prey on them if the parents aren't nearby. All the kits I've seen always seem to have an instinct to watch the skies for danger and anything bigger than a bluebird often causes them to run for cover. Beautiful early morning light make the scene as perfect as it could be at that moment.

This photo, along with many more, is available for purchase in many sizes and formats at my website, www.stevehinchphotography.com


 

Photo of the Week- "High Country Paintbrush

July 26, 2015  •  1 Comment


 

One of our favorite hikes is to Beehive Basin.  We try to do this hike at least once per year and more if we can, but with so much to do during the short summer season, it's not always possible.  Combine the beautiful mountain scenery with one of my favorite wildflowers, Indian Paintbrush, and it's a great combination.  Indian Paintbrush comes in many different colors, from red, to pink, orange, and, as seen here, magenta.  The wildflowers along this hike were amazing as we trekked up over 9,000 feet.  Below in the valleys, must of the flowers have dried up, so it was nice to see the different colors.